Campo de' Fiori: "Marco Polo", a one bedroom, sitting room attic with large roof garden
with spectacular views of all Rome, accommodating two persons
(or exceptionally three, please enquire)
Telephone, colour TV, air conditioning, washing machine, dishwasher, autonomous heating

 

Quarter presentation: with description, many photos, and map too. Just click on the photo to go to the page. To go directly to the map, please click here. Once there, please click on section A2 and the exact location of the apartment will be shown. To go directly to the section, please click here.

  Click the photo for quarter presentation

You are thinking about coming to Rome and have an apartment near all the sites? Why not an attic where from you can SEE THEM ALL!  Welcome to a corner of Paradise! Up there, amids the skies and clouds of Rome, you truly can embrace the Eternal City.  This attic is so beautiful and with so many aspects that we prepared two pages for it:

(a) the roof garden with view of all Rome  (this page) Terrace, right side: Sant'Andrea della Valle and San Carlo ai Catinari.  b)  the attic  (please click on the photo)   Welcome to a corner of paradise!

If you want to see the palazzo, please click here, in the underscored text.

THE ROOF GARDEN

There are very few attics with terrace having such views in Rome, and since they are owned by very wealthy persons, or belong to historical / institutional "palazzi", they are not rented, let alone for a short period. Amidst the skies and clouds, and under the starry nights you will experience unique sensations. You will also experience a cultural survey, as if you were a geographer, singling out a belfry or dome, going then in the quarter where you thought it should be located, and finding with the map or asking which it its. This is why the apartment is named after Marco Polo, the great Italian explorer. The roof garden is appr. 100 mts. large (appr. 1,000 sq. ft.).

(a) Terrace seen from its right side

(a) Terrace seen from its right side

Moreover it has a "C" shape, enabling to have views on all sides. Let us present it to you.

Terrace, view from the door

(b) Terrace, view from the door
giving access to it.

Terrace, view from its left side

(c) Terrace, view from its left side

Photo (b) shows the view while standing on the door giving access to the terrrace from the sitting room. Photo (a) shows the terrace seen from its right corner, and (c) from its opposite left corner. This is just to let you have an overview. Let's try now to see the views you can have.

Piazza and Palazzo della Cancelleria, Sant'Agnese

Photos (d, e, f) show better the front view of the terrace, i.e. what you can see from the position of photo (b). On the left side (d) you can see the majestic and most elegant Palazzo della Cancelleria (Chancellery Palace), built around 1490-1500 AD, which was the seat of the administration of Rome at the times of the Kingdom of the Popes.

Left: photo (d). Piazza and Palazzo della Cancelleria, Sant'Agnese

Spanish Steps domes, San Ivo alla Sapienza and the Pantheon

Photo (e). Spanish Steps domes, San Ivo alla Sapienza and the Pantheon

In front of it there is Piazza della Cancelleria, where the morning market of Campo de' Fiori took place temporarily when we snapped the photos.

You can see also in the background the dome of the Church of Sant'Agnese by F. Borromini, which is in Piazza Navona. In the middle (e), you can see the domes of the French Frairs Church on top of the Spanish Steps, the spiral dome of San Ivo alla Sapienza still by Borromini, and the flying saucer shape of the dome of the Pantheon, the largest in Rome (43.3 Mt., larger than St. Peter's !). At the right (f) you can see the Church of Sant'Andrea della Valle, with the second highest dome after St. Peter in Rome, and the Altare della Patria (Fatherland Altar) in Piazza Venezia, ended in 1911, to celebrate the reunion and independence of Italy (1860 AD). If you look carefully you will see the equestrian statue of King Victor Emanuel II in front of it.

Sant'Andrea della Valle, the Altare della Patria (Fatherland Altar)

Photo (f). Sant'Andrea della Valle, the Altare della Patria (Fatherland Altar)

The next photos (g,h) show the right side of the roof garden.

Terrace, right side: Sant'Andrea della Valle and San Carlo ai Catinari.

Photo (g). Terrace, right side: Sant'Andrea della Valle and San Carlo ai Catinari.

Here you find a large wooden table to dine out, with many chairs. As you can see, the view is breathtaking as you sit, and includes the Churches of Sant'Andrea della Valle and of San Carlo ai Catinari, on the way to the Jewish Quarter.

Terrace, right side: opposite view, Palazzo Farnese

Photo (h). Terrace, right side: opposite view, Palazzo Farnese.

As mentioned, the terrace has a "C" shape, and so as you turn right there is another view, of Palazzo Farnese (in Piazza Farnese), one of the largest palazzi in town. Built for Cardinal A. Farnese, it is the seat of the French Embassy, and also of one of the largest Italian libraries. It was built with contributions of Antonio da Sangallo and Michelangelo (click here to have more info and photo on the Palazzo).  The following photos (i, l, m, n,) show the views from the left side of the roof garden.

Terrace, lef side: the Janiculum

Photo (i). Terrace, lef side: the Janiculum
and Garibaldi statue.

Photo (i) shows the Bothanical Garden and the Janiculum, the hill and beatiful park overlooking Rome. The statue of Garibaldi dominating Rome, and the (blank) burst of the old cannon an noon commemorate the independence war of 1848.

Terrace, left side. St. Peter and San Giovanni Battista ai Fiorentini.

Photo (l). Terrace, left side. St. Peter
and San Giovanni Battista ai Fiorentini.

In this war the Roman patriots uprised against the Pope Pius VII, and proclaimed the Roman Republic. The pope called the French Army (a super-power at that time) to crush them.  It was not a walk as they thought, as it took 4 months of bloody battles in the Janiculum to capture the town. Photo (l) shows the Vatican and - among others - the dome of San Giovanni Battista ai Fiorentini, whose parish priest, a vegetarian, allows animals in the church as he (rightfully) considers them endowed with a soul.

From which cafe could you have such views?

Photo (m). Terrace, left side. Breakfast / tea table. From which cafe could you have such views?

Photo (m) shows better the breakfast / tea table. It is hard to think of a more panoramic place in Rome to have coffee. Or, while reading your Rome Guide, you can try to single out all the domes and monuments with a map.

Photo (n) shows a closer view of the Vatican, and particularly of the dome, built following the original plan of Michelangelo.

Left: photo (n). Terrace, left side.
Vatican, closer view.

Terrace, left side. Vatican, closer view.

 

Photo (o) shows the left portion of the terrace, which includes chairs where from enjoy views, a drying rack to hang clothes, a ladder, placed under a wooden porch (portico).

The roof garden is encircled by a protection barrier (you can see it indistinctly in photos a,b,o, after the wall). Yet tenants are asked to be very careful. In general, this attic is for careful and considerate tenants. Thank you.

Right photo (o). Terrace, left part.

Terrace, left portion.

       

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